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/ AMMA
YEAR
2020
CITY
NORILSK
CLIENT

ARCTIC MUSEUM OF MODERN ART(AMMA)

STATUS
CONCEPT
AUTHORS

BARIUDIN D.

MUKOSEI I.

RATNIKOVA E.

 

POSLEZAVTRA architects participated in an architectural residence in Norilsk, within which the concept of the Arctic Museum of Modern Art was created.


METAPHOR AND MORPHOLOGY

 

Shuba (rus. "fur coat") (1) is the most stable and well-established anthropogenic surface, ideally suited to the conditions of the Far North. You can even say that Shuba is the face of Norilsk architecture. Without it, it's practically unimaginable. However, it has never occurred to anyone to use the amazing “formal” properties of Shuba to the fullest. In our case, Shuba becomes a site-specific architectural metaphor, within which a transformation takes place: we wrap the building with a thick coat of gabions, turning it into a mountain/ hump/ snowdrift on the edge of the city. We fill up the house of trade – we dig out AMMA. Or – the house of trade falls asleep – AMMA wakes up.

 

The table mountains of the Putorana Plateau, including Mount Schmidt (2), the closest to the city, towering above Norilsk, are the most characteristic part of the surrounding urban landscape, which forms a pool of visual links. The emergence of a man-made mountain in the city is a memorial and almost sacred gesture, filled with respect and gratitude of the territory. It is full of stability and solidity, and the form has, in fact, natural monumentality, which seems to be absolutely necessary for the future museum, or the museum of the future.

 


Schmidt mountain photo author: Vitas Beneta

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SHAPING

The formal transformation / wrapping of the building in a Shuba / rebirth of the House of Trade in AMMA unfolds in a logic similar to mining processes: first, a trapezoid mountain appears above the main volume (1); then behind it rises above the existing extension a spur of restoration workshops and offices, and next to it there is a compact courtyard of the museum (2). The next step is transforming the exploited roof of the building (3). The last transformation opens up a view from the roof of Mount Schmidt, and the exit to the roof becomes a natural barrier to snow.

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DESIGN CODE

Gabion structures (1) to create the "fur coat" of the building – they use local loose stone. This stone makes AMMA material indistinguishable from other mountains of the Putorana Plateau. From corten steel (2), which is minimally subject to temperature and climatic changes, the facade panels of the courtyard facade are made. Corten perforated steel panels are installed in front of the stained glass windows of the small auditorium. Fine perforation allows you to "hide" the windows from the outside viewer, while not depriving the interior of sunlight and the view from the window. Aerodrome concrete slabs (3) are a precise prefab made according to decades of proven technology – used as a covering for an operated roof and overlappings.

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SECTOR PLANS
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WINTER. MUSEUM YARD
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SUMMER. VIEW FROM KOMSOMOLSKAYA ST.
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SUMMER. MUSEUM ROOF
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